the pronoun

the pronoun

The pronoun, the second of the eight parts of speech, is a word that takes
the place of a noun.

➲In the sentence, ‘‘Felipe is an intelligent student,’’ the noun, Felipe, can
be replaced by the singular pronoun he. Thus, the new sentence reads,
‘‘He is an intelligent student.’’
➲In the sentence, ‘‘We offered the baseball tickets to Rita and Drew,’’
the nouns, Rita and Drew, can be replaced by the plural pronoun,
them. The new sentence will now read, ‘‘We offered the baseball tickets
to them.’’

There are several types of pronouns.
Personal pronouns refer to people, places, things, and ideas. I, me, you,
your, they, us, and it are all personal pronouns.

Reflexive pronouns are formed by adding ‘‘-self’’ or ‘‘-selves’’ to cer-
tain personal pronouns. They ‘‘reflect’’ back to the person or thing
mentioned in the sentence. Myself, himself, herself, itself, yourself, your-
selves, and themselves are reflexive pronouns. There is no such word as
theirselves.

Demonstrative pronouns can be singular or plural. They point out a
specific person, place, or thing. This, that, these, and those are demonstrative
pronouns.

Interrogative pronouns, like their name suggests, are used when asking
a question. Who, whom, which, and whose are interrogative pronouns.
Indefinite pronouns do not refer to a specific person, place, or thing.
Some indefinite pronouns are another, both, everyone, most, no one, and
several.

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  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
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    Pink Lakes of the World

    Port Gregory Western Australia 1

    The algae develops the beta carotene pigment when the lake water reaches a salinity level greater than that of sea water and when adequate light and temperature conditions are achieved.

    Weather conditions


    Look at this list of common weather words. Notice that it is very common to form adjectives by adding ‘-y’.



    Note: When it rains for a short period of time, we call it a shower, e.g. We had several showers yesterday afternoon.
    When it is raining a lot we often say it’s pouring or it’s pouring with rain. This phrase is much more common than ‘it’s raining cats and dogs’, which many students seem to learn.

    Temperature




    People round the world have different ideas about temperature:
    5°C (five degrees centigrade) is freezing for many Brazilians.
    -10°C (minus ten degrees or ten degrees below zero) is very cold but quite normal in the mountains in Switzerland during the winter when it usually snows a lot.
    30-35°C is boiling for England and very unusual, but it is very common in parts of Spain during the summer.

    Wind


    The first word here is very gentle; the last is more than 100 km per hour and can be very dangerous.

    a breeze a wind a strong wind a gale a hurricane

    It was a hot day but there was a lovely breeze.
    The wind blew my hat off.
    The hurricane in Florida destroyed trees and buildings.

    Thunderstorms


    A spell (= period) of very hot weather often ends with a thunderstorm. First it becomes very humid (= hot and wet), then you get thunder and lightning, and finally, very heavy rain (= it pours with rain). Afterwards, it is usually cooler and it feels fresher.
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