Spotting Errors in Sentence - Test-09

Spotting Errors in Sentence
Directions: In each of the questions, find out which part of the sentence has an error.


1. Raman developed the (a) / habit for sleeping late (b) / when he was (c) staying in the hostel. (d) / No error (e)


2. Our Mathematics teacher (a) / often emphasises on (b) / the ned for a lot of practice. (c) / No error (d)


3. The remark made (a) / in the review is on (b) / the other chapter (c) / and havig little relevance. (d) / No error (e)


4. He is (a) / taller (b) / than me. (c) /No error (d)


5. One of them (a) / forget to take their bag (b) from the school. (c) / No error (d)



6. Having deprived from their homes (a) in the recent earthquake, (b) / they had no other option but (c) / to take shelter in a school. (d) / No error (e)


7. Ever since the govemment (a) / announced its new policy, (b) / the private institutions had (c) / run into heavy weather. (d) / No error (e)


8. You will come (a) / to my party tomorrow, (b) / isn't it ?(c) / No error (d)


9. Wearing extremely fashionable clothes (a) / and surrounded by photographers and pressmen, (b) / she swept up to the microphone. (c) / No error (d)


10. The crowd of angry students (a) / ordered the (b)'l closing of shops. (c) / No error (d)


English Test

1. Spotting Errors in Sentence - Test-10
2. Spotting Errors in Sentence - Test-11
3. Spotting Errors in Sentence - Test-12
4. Spotting Errors in Sentence - Test-13
5. Spotting Errors in Sentence - Test-14
6. Spotting Errors in Sentence - Test-15
7. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-01
8. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-02
9. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-03
10. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-04
11. Ordering of Words in a Sentence - Test-05
12. Ordering of Sentences - Test-01
13. Ordering of Sentences - Test-02
14. Ordering of Sentences - Test-03
15. Ordering of Sentences - Test-04
16. Ordering of Sentences - Test-05
17. Ordering of Sentences - Test-06
18. Sentence Completion - Test-01
19. Sentence Completion - Test-02
20. Sentence Completion - Test-03

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Interior Design Ideas

Bedroom colour scheme

The master bedroom in this petite, 90sq metre family home in Londons Chelsea is the work of designer Eve Mercier. The two Rothko esque panels that flank the bed are not paint but vibrant silk, a good option if youre a renter who cant paint the walls, or for adding colour to a space enhancing white scheme. The Fifties style Danish bedside tables come from Chelsea Textiles ?498 each, a good source for chic and simple designs. On top of them are Forties Quindry lamps.

Basic English Usage
Different kinds of adverbs go in different positions in a clause. Here are some general rules (Note: these rules apply both to one-word adverbs and to adverb phrases of two or more words.)

Verb and object
We do not usually put adverbs between a verb and its object.

[...adverb + verb + object] [verb + adverb + object]
I very much like my job. (NOT I like very much-my job.)
[...verb + object + adverb]
She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks well English.)

Initial, mid and end position

There are three normal positions for adverbs:
a. initial position (at the beginning of a clause)
- Yesterday morning something very strange happened.
b. mid-position (with the verb - for the exact position)
- My brother completely forgot my birthday.
c. end position (at the end of a clause)
- What are you doing tomorrow?
Most adverb phrases (adverbs of two or more words) cannot go in mid-position. Compare:
- He got dressed quickly. He quickly got dressed.
- (Quickly can go in end or mid-position.)
- He got dressed in a hurry. (NOT He in a hurry got dressed.)
- (In a hurry cannot go in mid-position.)

What goes where?
a. initial position
- Connecting adverbs (which join a clause to what came before). Time adverbs can also go here .
- However, not everybody agreed. (connecting adverb)
- Tomorrow I've got a meeting in Cardiff, (time adverb)

b. mid-position
- Focusing adverbs (which emphasize one part of the clause); adverbs of certainty and completeness; adverbs of indefinite frequency; some adverbs of manner.
- He's been everywhere he's even been to Antarctica, (focusing adverb)
- It will probably rain this evening, (certainty)
- I've almost finished painting the house, (completeness)
- My boss often travels to America, (indefinite frequency)
- He quickly got dressed, (manner)

c. end-position

Adverbs of manner (how), place (where) and time (when) most often go in end-position.
- She brushed her hair slowly. (manner)
- The children are playing upstairs. (place)
- I phoned Alex this morning. (time)
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