Ordering of Sentences - Test-01

Ordering of Sentences
Directions:In the following items each passage consists of six sentences. The first and the sixth sentence are given in the beginning. The middle four sentences in each have been removed and jumbled up. These are labelled P, Q R and S. You are required to find out the proper sequence of the four sentences.


1. S1: American private lives may seem shallow.
S6: This would not happen in China, he said.

P: Students would walk away with books they had not paid for.
Q: A Chinese journalist commented on a curious institution: the library.
R: Their public morality, however, impressed visitors.
S: But in general they returned them.


2. S1: A transformation of consciousness is now beginning to express itself in the field of theoretical architecture.
S6: The relationship between culture and nature is changed, for the architect grows a house like a garden.

P: In the still theoretical structure an attempt is being made to create a house that is "a domestication of an ecosystem."
Q: What is happening in the architecture is a shift from the international style of the post industrial era to a symbolic structure.
R: Since architecture is the collective unconscious made visible, the architect does not himself always understand the full cultural implications of his own work.
S: The new form is not a celebration of power over new materials, but a celebration of cooperation with ecosystem.


3. S1: She used to work at the desk next to mine in the office several years ago.
S6: I am glad that their demands have been accepted.

P: But it must have been exasperating that a male sitting beside her was 'doing the same work as she was and being paid more.
Q: She is certain to be still there, in the same old brown suit and fur lined boots.
R: She was as kind as she was efficient.
S: Now she and all her friends have won their long campaign for the justice of equal pay to be recognised.


4. S1: The role of the precious yellow metal is undergoing a dramatic change.
S6: Again, it would not be an economic proposition to buy and sell gold ornaments as an instrument of investment as buying would be costlier and selling will be at a discount.

P: In developing countries like India, where gold is used mainly for ornaments, a distinct change in attitude is in the offing.
Q: Slowly, the use of gold in the form of ornaments will be on the decline and even if gold prices shoot up, women folk would not like to sell off their ornaments.
R: The yellow metal will soon be treated as an investment instrument.
S: The maxim, "Larger the gold reserves, richer the country" will not hold good for a long time.


5. S1: In other words, grammar grows and changeg, and there is no such thing as correct use of English for the past, the present and the future.
S6: All the words that man has invented are divided into eight classes, which are called parts of speech.

P: "The door is broke."
Q: Yet this would have been correct in Shakespeare's time.
R: Today, only an uneducated person would say, "My arm is broke."
S: For example, in Shakespeare's play Hamlet, there is the line.



6. S1: Yawning or its absence has been related to various clinical conditions.
S6: It is in reality a releasing stimulus.

P: Interestingly, some clinicians claim that those with acute physical illness don't yawn until they are on the road to recovery.
Q: It can be a symptom of brain lesions, haemorrhage, motion sickness and encephalitis.
R: But what is currently known about yawning is essentially anecdotal, mostly because the yawn has not got the respect it deserves.
S: On the other hand, it has been reported that psychotics rarely yawn, except those suffering from brain damage.


7. S1: Of the scholars who compose a university, some may be expected to devote an unbroken leisure to learning, their fellows having the advantage of their knowledge from their conversation, and the world perhaps from their writings.
S6: There classes of persons, then, go to compose a university as we know it - the scholar, the scholar who is also a teacher, and those who come to be taught, the undergraduate.

P: Others, however, will engage themselves to teach as well as to learn.
Q: Those who come to be taught at a university have to provide evidence that they are not merely beginners and not only do they have displayed before them the learning of their teachers, but they are offered a curriculum of study, to be followed by a test and the award of a degree.
R: But here again, it is the special manner of the pedagogic enterprise which distinguishes a university.
S: A place of learning without this could . scarcely be called a university.


8. S1: The future beckons to us.
S6: There is no resting for anyone of us till we redeem our pledge in full.

P: In fact we have hard work ahead.
Q: Where do we go and what shall be our endeavour?
R: We shall also have to fight and end poverty, ignorance and disease.
S: It will be to bring freedom and opportunity to the common man.


9. S1: The mail is first collected from different letter boxes.
S6: Finally it is delivered to us.

P: From there it is sent to the head post office.
Q: It is then sorted out at the sorting office.
R: The mail is again sorted out at the head office by the concerned beat postman.
S: The sorted mail is sent to the zonal post office.


10. S1: In hunting and gathering societies people live in what anthropologists call "the seasonal round."
S6: The circle is not broken into a line; the tribe does not stay in one place altering nature to suit the needs of the human settlement.

P: When the salmon are running, it comes to the stream; when the wild grasseg must be gathered, the band moves on again.
Q: The tribal band is delicately adjusted to nature.
R: It circulates through space in the rhythm of the seasons each year.
S: It moves through space with the flow of time.


English Test

1. Ordering of Sentences - Test-02
2. Ordering of Sentences - Test-03
3. Ordering of Sentences - Test-04
4. Ordering of Sentences - Test-05
5. Ordering of Sentences - Test-06
6. Sentence Completion - Test-01
7. Sentence Completion - Test-02
8. Sentence Completion - Test-03
9. Sentence Completion - Test-04
10. Sentence Completion - Test-05
11. Sentence Completion - Test-06
12. General Elementary English Test - 01
13. General Elementary English Test - 02
14. General Elementary English Test - 03
15. General Elementary English Test - 04
16. General Elementary English Test - 05
17. General Elementary English Test - 06
18. General Elementary English Test - 07
19. General Elementary English Test - 08
20. General Elementary English Test - 09

My Account / Test History


SuperFood

Eggs Organic Omega 3

Eggs have long been known as a good, inexpensive source of animal protein. They lost favor for a time when the role of cholesterol in heart disease was first identified, because egg yolks do contain a fairly high concentration of cholesterol (though the whites are cholesterol-free). Research since that time has determined that an egg a day will not raise the risk of heart disease for most people. Those who already have high cholesterol may want to limit their intake of yolks to two a week. Egg yolks are an excellent source of choline and lutein. Choline, an antioxidant, may be involved in reducing levels of homocysteine, thereby helping reduce the risk of heart disease.
Lutein, found in the retina, may help prevent macular degeneration; it also has antioxidant properties. Eggs are also a good source of vitamin B12 and folate.
Hens fed a diet of flaxseed, which is itself high in omega-3 fatty acids, produce eggs that are also high in omega-3s. These eggs may have as much as seven times the omega-3 fatty acids of conventional eggs. They also contain more vitamin E.
Nutritional Facts :
One large whole egg provides 75 calories, 0.6 g carbohydrate, 6.2 g protein, 5 g fat, 0 g dietary fiber, 213 mg cholesterol, 318 IU vitamin A, 24 mcg folic acid, 61 mg potassium, 63 mg sodium, 89 mg phosphorus, 25 mg calcium, and 5 mg magnesium.

Home
My Account
English Test
Verbal Reasoning
GK Quiz
Grammar Test