Vocabulary - Sentence Completion - 04

Vocabulary Examination - Sentence Completion
These tests improve your vocabulary, ability to follow the internal logic of sentences and elimination skill process.


1. Oliver was unable to ________ himself from the difficulties he had caused by forging the documents.


2. Marvin’s ________ prevented him from finishing his work and was evidenced in his large phone bills.


3. The firefighter was ________ in the news for his heroic rescue of a child from a burning house.


4. The knight sought to ________ his broadsword in such a menacing fashion as to frighten his attacker away.


5. The discovery of the new element was ________; the scientist was looking for something else.



6. Brian was an ________ child, he was sent to the principal’s office on numerous occasions for his rude classroom behavior.


7. David felt as if the family picnic would be a(n) ________ time to talk with his grandmother about her plans for the holidays.


8. Although the villagers’ lives were profoundly different from her own, Jing-Mae felt a deep ________ for the people when she served in the Peace Corps.


9. The ________ butter had been left in the refrigerator for years.


10. The ________ of the sheriff’s department ended at the county line.


English Test

1. Vocabulary - Sentence Completion - 05
2. Vocabulary - Sentence Completion - 06
3. Vocabulary - Sentence Completion - 07
4. Vocabulary - Sentence Completion - 08
5. Vocabulary - Sentence Completion - 09
6. Vocabulary - Sentence Completion - 10
7. Synonyms - Test-25
8. Synonyms - Test-26
9. Synonyms - Test-27
10. Antonym Test - 11
11. Antonym Test - 12
12. Antonym Test - 13
13. Vocabulary - Synonyms Antonyms - 01
14. Vocabulary - Synonyms Antonyms - 02
15. Vocabulary - Synonyms Antonyms - 03
16. Vocabulary - Synonyms Antonyms - 04
17. Vocabulary - Synonyms Antonyms - 05
18. Antonym Test - 14
19. Antonym Test - 15
20. Antonym Test - 16

My Account / Test History


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Prepositions
Different kinds of adverbs go in different positions in a clause. Here are some general rules (Note: these rules apply both to one-word adverbs and to adverb phrases of two or more words.)

Verb and object
We do not usually put adverbs between a verb and its object.

[...adverb + verb + object] [verb + adverb + object]
I very much like my job. (NOT I like very much-my job.)
[...verb + object + adverb]
She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks well English.)

Initial, mid and end position

There are three normal positions for adverbs:
a. initial position (at the beginning of a clause)
- Yesterday morning something very strange happened.
b. mid-position (with the verb - for the exact position)
- My brother completely forgot my birthday.
c. end position (at the end of a clause)
- What are you doing tomorrow?
Most adverb phrases (adverbs of two or more words) cannot go in mid-position. Compare:
- He got dressed quickly. He quickly got dressed.
- (Quickly can go in end or mid-position.)
- He got dressed in a hurry. (NOT He in a hurry got dressed.)
- (In a hurry cannot go in mid-position.)

What goes where?
a. initial position
- Connecting adverbs (which join a clause to what came before). Time adverbs can also go here .
- However, not everybody agreed. (connecting adverb)
- Tomorrow I've got a meeting in Cardiff, (time adverb)

b. mid-position
- Focusing adverbs (which emphasize one part of the clause); adverbs of certainty and completeness; adverbs of indefinite frequency; some adverbs of manner.
- He's been everywhere — he's even been to Antarctica, (focusing adverb)
- It will probably rain this evening, (certainty)
- I've almost finished painting the house, (completeness)
- My boss often travels to America, (indefinite frequency)
- He quickly got dressed, (manner)

c. end-position

Adverbs of manner (how), place (where) and time (when) most often go in end-position.
- She brushed her hair slowly. (manner)
- The children are playing upstairs. (place)
- I phoned Alex this morning. (time)
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