Sound a like words Part Two

Sound a like words Part Two

Here are some more paired words that sound the same. Review them, and then use them in
your writings and speech.

  • formally: in a refined way
    He formally asked the girl to the banquet.
    formerly: in the past
    The new soldier had formerly lived in Duluth, Minnesota.
  • hear: to use the ears to pick up sounds
    Did you hear that animal’s howl?
    here: this place; sentence starter
    I placed the card right here, and now it is gone.
    Here are the finalists in our contest.
  • its: personal pronoun for the neuter-gender words
    The contest has grown in its importance.
    it’s: contraction for it + is
    It’s going to be a good beach day tomorrow.
  • loose: opposite of tight
    The new bathing suit felt too loose on the swimmer.
    lose: to fail; the opposite of ‘‘to find’’
    The coach did not want to lose the game in that manner.
    Did you lose your keys at the park?
  • quiet: opposite of loud
    Please be quiet in the library.
    quite: to a high degree
    Winston was quite tall for his age.
  • peace: opposite of war
    Most people prefer peace over war.
    piece: a portion or part
    May I have a piece of pepperoni pizza, please?
  • --- >>>
  • the interjection
  • Active and passive voices
  • agreement between indefinite pronouns and their antecedents
  • agreement involving prepositional phrases
  • Commas Part Five
  • Commas Part Four
  • Commas Part One
  • Commas Part Three
  • Commas Part Two
  • complete and simple predicates
  • complete and simple subjects
  • complex sentences
  • compound complex sentences
  • compound prepositions and the preposition adverb question
  • compound subject and compound predicate
  • compound subjects part two
  • compound subjects part one
  • Confusing usage words part eight
  • Confusing usage words part five
  • Confusing usage words part four
  • Confusing usage words part one
  • Confusing usage words part seven
  • Confusing usage words part six
  • Confusing usage words part three
  • Confusing usage words part three 2
  • Confusing usage words part two
  • First Capitalization List
  • indefinite pronouns
  • Indefinite pronouns and the possessive case
  • introducing clauses
  • introducing phrases
  • Irregular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • irregular verbs part one
  • irregular verbs part two
  • Italics Hyphens and Brackets
  • Misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • More Apostrophe Situations
  • More subject verb agreement situations
  • Parentheses Ellipsis Marks and Dashes
  • Periods Question Marks and Exclamation Marks
  • personal pronouns
  • pronouns and their antecedents
  • Quotation Marks Part Three
  • Quotation Marks Part One
  • Quotation Marks Part Two
  • reflexive demonstrative and interrogative pronouns
  • Regular Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs
  • regular verb tenses
  • Second Capitalization List
  • sentences fragments and run on sentences
  • singular and plural nouns and pronouns
  • Sound a like words Part Four
  • Sound a like words Part Three
  • Sound a like words Part Two
  • Sound alike words part one
  • subject and verb agreement
  • subject complements predicate nominatives and predicate adjectives
  • subject verb agreement situations
  • the adjective
  • the adjective clause
  • the adjective phrase
  • the adverb
  • the adverb clause
  • the adverb phrase
  • The Apostrophe
  • the appositive
  • The Colon
  • The coordinating conjunction
  • the correlative conjunction
  • the direct object
  • the gerund and gerund phrase
  • the indirect object
  • the infinitive and infinitive phrase
  • The nominative case
  • the noun
  • the noun adjective pronoun question
  • the noun clause
  • the object of the preposition
  • the participle and participial phrase
  • The possessive case
  • The possessive case 2
  • The possessive case and pronouns
  • the preposition
  • the prepositional phrase
  • the pronoun
  • The Semicolon
  • the subordinating conjunction
  • the verb
  • The verb be
  • the verb phrase
  • Transitive and intransitive verbs
  • types of nouns
  • types of sentences by purpose
  • Using Capital Letters
  • what good writers do
  • My Account / Test History


    Benefits of Mangoes

    Improves Complexion

    Mangoes are packed with vitamin A which is a vital nutrient for maintaining a healthy skin and complexion as well as the integrity of mucous membranes. Mango skin is a great deandtanning agent. You can rub your face and hands with the skin of a ripe or raw mango and apply some milk cream on it. Wash off with cold water after 10 to 15 minutes. Doing this at least twice or thrice a week will reduce tanning drastically. Regular consumption of mangoes provides you with a fair and smooth skin.

  • We can use exceptor except for after all, any, every, no, anything/body/ one/where, everything/body/one/where, nothing/body/one/where, and whole— that is to say, words which suggest the idea of a total.
    In other cases we usually use except for, but not except.
    Compare:
      He ate everything on his plate except (for) the beans.
      He ate the whole meal except (for) the beans.
      He ate the meal except for the beans.
      (NOT . . . except the beans.)
      I've cleaned all the rooms except (for) the bathroom.
      I've cleaned the whole house except (for) the bathroom. I've cleaned the house except for the bathroom.
      (NOT . . . except the bathroom.)
      We're all here except (for) John and Mary.
      Except for John and Mary we're all here.
  • We use except, not except lor, before prepositions and conjunctions.
      It's the same everywhere except in Scotland.
      She's beautiful except when she smiles.
  • .. Next ...
    Home
    My Account
    English Test
    Verbal Reasoning
    GK Quiz
    Grammar Test