the interjection

the interjection

The interjection, the eighth part of speech, expresses strong emotions or
feelings. Often found at the beginning of a sentence, an interjection is usually
followed by either an exclamation mark (for strong emotions) or a comma
(for mild emotions). An interjection can also be used to protest or command.
Though interjections can stand alone, they are often contained within larger
groups of words.

Wow! That was a close call. (strong emotion)
Oh, you are correct. (mild emotion)

Note: Good writers choose their interjections wisely for they know that too
many interjections can decrease the writing’s power and total effect.
Here is a list of the most common interjections.
aw ahem bravo darn dear me eh
eek gee golly goodness gracious gosh hello
hey hi hurrah hurray no oh
oh no oops phew psst rats ugh
whoa wow yea yeh yes yippee

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    Makeover Tips For Eyes

    Purple ize Your Eyes

    Pretty in pink Try posh in purple. The stars are lighting up the red carpet with eyes awash in shades of lilac, amethyst and indigo. Purple is a great shade for spring because its totally feminine and romantic, says celebrity makeup artist and LORAC founder Carol Shaw.Here, Shaw shares her tips on how to update this classically feminine shade for a look thats more modern romantic than 80?s prom queen.
    When wearing purple during the day, be subtle. Use brown eyeshadow as a base and then pump it up with purple. This is good for daytime, because it is a soft look that still uses color, says Shaw. Start off with a natural beige on the lids, followed by a soft brown in the crease. Then line your eyes with a purple eyeshadow or eyeliner for a pop of color.We like >Laura Mercier Sateen Eye Colour in Orchid.
    For a night out purple, turn up the color volume with a smoky eye. Start off with a soft pink eyeshadow as the base color from lash line to crease, says Shaw. Highlight with a shimmery white eyeshadow under the browbone, then add a deep purple eyeshadow to the crease and outer corner. We like >LORAC Rhapsody Eye Shadow. Finish by lining eyes with a black pencil or dark purple eyeliner.No matter the intensity you choose, keep the rest of your makeup soft and in the same color family to avoid looking harsh or dated. Avoid bronzer and bright lipstick when using purple eyeshadows, she says. Stick with soft pink cheeks and nude or baby pink lips to complete that modern romantic look.

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