the noun clause

the noun clause

object of the preposition, or
a predicate nominative. This type of clause often starts with any one of these
words—how, that, what, whatever, when, where, whether, which, whichever, who,
whoever, whom, whomever, whose, and why.

The noun clause is underlined in each of these sentences. Its function within
the sentence follows in the parentheses.

What you thought about that candidate is correct. (subject)
The paleontologist remembers when he met you at the conference.
(direct object)
Will these older folks recall how they were part of a terrific
generation?
(direct object)
Remind whoever is on your discussion panel that we will meet
tomorrow morning in the library. (indirect object)
Give whoever needs that information the correct numbers.
(indirect object)
Mr. Bellington reminded us of where we should obtain the necessary
papers for our licenses
. (object of the preposition)
My children’s request is that you wear your silly tie to the birthday
party.
(predicate nominative)
The lady’s wish is that you bring her some pansies and daisies.
(predicate nominative)

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    Benefits of Swiss Chard

    Lentil or bean soup

    Give soup an extra nutrient boost by adding the greens during the last 15 minutes of cooking. Swiss chard is a member of the beet family, but it doesn t produce an edible bulbous root. The dark green leaves and the juicy leaf stalks (petioles), however, are completely edible and have high nutritional value. Thanks to its broad range of nutrients, Swiss chard is a real superfood with a whole range of health benefits.

    Prepositions
    Very and Too - Too

    Don't Say:
    It's now very hot to play football.

    Say:
    It's now too hot to play football.

    Note:
    Very simply makes the adjective or adverb stronger. Too means more than enough, or so much that something else happens as a result.
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