the object of the preposition

the object of the preposition

The object of the preposition is the noun or pronoun that follows a prepo-
sition and completes the prepositional phrase. The prepositional phrase can
also includemodifiers.

In the sentence, ‘‘The orange juice box was in the new refrigerator,’’ the
prepositional phrase is ‘‘in the new refrigerator.’’ This phrase answers
the question ‘‘Where (is the orange juice box)?’’ The object of the preposition
is refrigerator. The modifier, or describer, is new.
The compound objects of the preposition are two or more objects, such as
‘‘Mom (and) Dad’’ in the sentence, ‘‘The party was paid for by Mom and Dad.’’

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    Dog Breeds

    Italian Greyhound

    The Italian Greyhound is a small breed of dog of the sight hound type, sometimes called an I.G. The true breed origins are unknown. The Italian Greyhound is the smallest[3] of the sighthounds, typically weighing about 8 to 18 lb (3.6 to 8.2 kg) and standing about 13 to 15 inches (33 to 38 cm) tall at the withers.Though they are in the toy group based on their weight, they are larger than other dogs in the category due to their slender bodies, so owners must be careful when sizing clothing or accommodations. The Italian Greyhound's chest is deep, with a tucked up abdomen, long slender legs and a long neck that tapers down to a small head. The face is long and pointed, like a full sized greyhound. Overall, they look like miniature Greyhounds. Though many Italian Greyhound owners dispute the use of the term miniature Greyhound in reference to the breed itself, by definition of the American Kennel Club[5] they are true genetic greyhounds, with a bloodline extending back over 2,000 years. Their current small stature is a function of selective breeding. Their gait is distinctive and should be high stepping and free, rather like that of a horse. They are able to run at top speed with a double suspension gallop,[6] and can achieve a top speed of up to 25 miles per hour (40 km/h). The color of the coat is a subject of much discussion. For The Kennel Club (UK), the American Kennel Club, and the Australian National Kennel Council, parti colored Italian Greyhounds are accepted, while the F?d?ration Cynologique Internationale standard for international shows allows white only on the chest and feet. The modern Italian Greyhound's appearance is a result of breeders throughout Europe, particularly Austrian, German, Italian, French and British breeders, making great contributions to the forming of this breed. The Italian Greyhound should resemble a small Greyhound, or rather a Sloughi, though they are in appearance more elegant and graceful.

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