complete and simple subjects

complete and simple subjects

➲ The complete subject (the noun or pronoun that performs the action)
contains all the words that help to identify the main person, place,
thing, or idea in the sentence.
The complete subject in each sentence is italicized.
Many teachers and two principals from our school attended the musical
concert.
Giraffes and monkeys in the local zoo captured the childrenís interest
yesterday.
This novelís last few chapters are replete with great sensory language.

➲ The simple subject is the main word within the complete subject.
The simple subject is italicized in each of these sentences.

This taco from the local store was quite tasty.
Some people never cease to amaze me.
These two swimmers graduated from the same high school.
Around the corner is the local theater.

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    Simple Science

    Red a Warm Color

    Heat and Light as Companions:
    We have seen that heat and light usually go hand in hand. In summer we lower the shades and close the blinds in order to keep the house cool, because the exclusion of light means the exclusion of some heat; in winter we open the blinds and raise the shades in order that the sun may stream into the room and flood it with light and warmth. The heat of the sun and the light of the sun seem boon companions.

    We can show that when light passes through a prism and is refracted, forming a spectrum, it is accompanied by heat. If we hold a sensitive thermometer in the violet end of the spectrum so that the violet rays fall upon the bulb, the reading of the mercury will be practically the same as when the thermometer is held in any dark part of the room; if, however, the thermometer is slowly moved toward the red end of the spectrum, a change occurs and the mercury rises slowly but steadily, showing that heat rays are present at the red end of the spectrum. This agrees with the popular notion, formed independently of science, which calls the reds the warm colors. Every one of us associates red with warmth; in the summer red is rarely worn, it looks hot; but in winter red is one of the most pleasing colors because of the sense of warmth and cheer it brings.

    All light rays are accompanied by a small amount of heat, but the red rays carry the most.

    What seems perhaps the most unexpected thing, is that the temperature, as indicated by a sensitive thermometer, continues to rise if the thermometer is moved just beyond the red light of the spectrum. There actually seems to be more heat beyond the red than in the red, but if the thermometer is moved too far away, the temperature again falls. Later we shall see what this means.

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