prepositions - behind

Prepositions - Behind

1. Behind means in the rear of.
The trash can is behind the chair.
My friend sits behind me in class.

2. Behind can mean less advanced than.
Miss Thompson's class is studying lesson three; the other classes are studying
Lesson four. Miss Thompson's class is behind the other classes.

3. Behind can mean left in the past.
He is rich now; all his financial problems are behind him.

4. Behind can mean late.

Expressions:

1. behind schedule—later than usual
The train is behind schedule.

2. behind in payments—late in making a regular payment
She is always behind in her rent payments.

5. Behind can mean encouraging or supporting.

Pattern: noun + behind + noun
The successful man had an ambitious woman behind him.
Those candidates have a lot of money behind them.
There must be a greedy person behind this scheme.

Typical nouns after behind:
a person or people
idea, plan, plot, project, scheme

6. Expressions
behind the scenes—not seen
The lawyer knew all the facts about the case; he had a lot of help behind the scenes.

behind the times—old-fashioned
Her dad still uses a typewriter; he is really behind the times.
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  • Prepositions - About
  • Prepositions - Above
  • Prepositions - Across
  • Prepositions - After
  • Prepositions - Against
  • Prepositions - Ahead Of
  • Prepositions - Along
  • Prepositions - Among
  • Prepositions - Around
  • Prepositions - As
  • Prepositions - At
  • Prepositions - Back to/Back From
  • Prepositions - Before
  • Prepositions - Behind
  • Prepositions - Below
  • Prepositions - Beneath
  • Prepositions - Beside
  • Prepositions - Besides
  • Prepositions - Between
  • Prepositions - Beyond
  • Prepositions - But
  • Prepositions - By
  • Prepositions - Close To
  • Prepositions - Despite/In Spite Of
  • Prepositions - Down
  • Prepositions - During
  • Prepositions - Except
  • Prepositions - Far From
  • Prepositions - For
  • Prepositions - From
  • Prepositions - In
  • Prepositions - In Back Of
  • Prepositions - In Front Of
  • Prepositions - Inside
  • Prepositions - Instead Of
  • Prepositions - Into
  • Prepositions - Like
  • Prepositions - Near
  • Prepositions - Next To
  • Prepositions - Of
  • Prepositions - Off
  • Prepositions - On
  • Prepositions - On Top Of
  • Prepositions - Onto
  • Prepositions - Opposite
  • Prepositions - Out
  • Prepositions - Outside
  • Prepositions - Over
  • Prepositions - Past
  • Prepositions - Through
  • Prepositions - Throughout
  • Prepositions - To
  • Prepositions - Toward
  • Prepositions - Towards
  • Prepositions - Under
  • Prepositions - Underneath
  • Prepositions - Until
  • Prepositions - Up
  • Prepositions - With
  • Prepositions - Within
  • Prepositions - Without
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    To win is to be #1 in a competition, or to receive an award.
  • My soccer team won the game 3-1.
  • I want to win the lottery!
  • John won a prize in the science competition.

    You can win a game, a race, a match, a competition, or the lottery. You can also win a medal (like in the Olympics), a prize, or an award.

    To earn something is to get something in exchange for your work or effort, for example: a salary.
  • Sarah is a famous lawyer; she earns a lot of money.
  • I'm not rich, but I earn a decent salary.
  • My bank account earns 2% interest per month.

    To gain something is simply to get or increase - not necessarily because of action:
  • I've gained five pounds since I stopped exercising.
  • Jack's car gained speed as he drove down the mountain.
  • The company is gaining international recognition.

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