Prepositions - Past

Prepositions - Past

1. Past means beyond.

Pattern: be + past + noun referring to age
The gas station is on your left, just past the shopping center.

2. Past indicates movement in front of and beyond a place.

Pattern: verb + past + noun
We drove past your house on our way to the party.
They often walk past the park.

3. Past means older than.

Pattern: be + past + noun referring to age
His daughter is past her teens now.
I'm sure he is past fifty.

4. Past means no longer able to do something.

Pattern: be + past + verb in gerund form
She is bitter now, and past caring.
The men were exhausted and past working.

5 Past (adverb) means later than.
Pattern: be + past + noun referring to time
It is ten past three in the afternoon.
They left at half past seven.
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  • Prepositions - About
  • Prepositions - Above
  • Prepositions - Across
  • Prepositions - After
  • Prepositions - Against
  • Prepositions - Ahead Of
  • Prepositions - Along
  • Prepositions - Among
  • Prepositions - Around
  • Prepositions - As
  • Prepositions - At
  • Prepositions - Back to/Back From
  • Prepositions - Before
  • Prepositions - Behind
  • Prepositions - Below
  • Prepositions - Beneath
  • Prepositions - Beside
  • Prepositions - Besides
  • Prepositions - Between
  • Prepositions - Beyond
  • Prepositions - But
  • Prepositions - By
  • Prepositions - Close To
  • Prepositions - Despite/In Spite Of
  • Prepositions - Down
  • Prepositions - During
  • Prepositions - Except
  • Prepositions - Far From
  • Prepositions - For
  • Prepositions - From
  • Prepositions - In
  • Prepositions - In Back Of
  • Prepositions - In Front Of
  • Prepositions - Inside
  • Prepositions - Instead Of
  • Prepositions - Into
  • Prepositions - Like
  • Prepositions - Near
  • Prepositions - Next To
  • Prepositions - Of
  • Prepositions - Off
  • Prepositions - On
  • Prepositions - On Top Of
  • Prepositions - Onto
  • Prepositions - Opposite
  • Prepositions - Out
  • Prepositions - Outside
  • Prepositions - Over
  • Prepositions - Past
  • Prepositions - Through
  • Prepositions - Throughout
  • Prepositions - To
  • Prepositions - Toward
  • Prepositions - Towards
  • Prepositions - Under
  • Prepositions - Underneath
  • Prepositions - Until
  • Prepositions - Up
  • Prepositions - With
  • Prepositions - Within
  • Prepositions - Without
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    Rules to play High Jump

    The approach

    The objective of the approach is to gradually accelerate to a maximum controlled speed at takeoff. The most important factor for the distance traveled by an object is its velocity at takeoff both the speed and angle. Elite jumpers usually leave the ground at an angle of twenty degrees or less; therefore, it is more beneficial for a jumper to focus on the speed component of the jump. The greater the speed at takeoff, the higher the trajectory of the center of mass will be. The importance of a takeoff speed is a factor in the success of sprinters in this event.

    The length of the approach is usually consistent distance for an athlete. Approaches can vary between 12 and 19 strides on the novice and intermediate levels, while at the elite level they are closer to between 20 and 22 strides. The exact distance and number of strides in an approach depends on the jumpers experience, sprinting technique, and conditioning level. Consistency in the approach is important as it is the competitors objective to get as close to the front of the takeoff board as possible without crossing the line with any part of the foot. Inconsistent approaches are a common problem in the event. As a result the approach is usually practiced by athletes about 6 8 times per jumping session see Training below.

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